Priscilla Daigre

Foot Disorders

Mortons Neuroma Treatments

Overview

plantar neuromaMorton?s Neuroma is a pathological condition of the common digital nerve in the foot, most frequently between the third and fourth metatarsals (third inter-metatarsal space). The nerve sheath becomes abnormally thickened with fibrous (scar) tissue and the nerve fibres eventually deteriorate.This condition is named for the American surgeon, Thomas George Morton (1835-1903), who first recognised the condition in 1876. Incidentally his father was the dentist who discovered the anaesthetics; initially Nitrous oxide, the very gas used today in cryosurgery for the condition his son lent his name to? Morton?s neuroma.

Causes

The exact cause is unknown. Doctors believe the following may play a role in the development of this condition. Wearing tight shoes and high heels. Abnormal positioning of toes. Flat feet. Forefoot problems, including bunions and hammer toes. High foot arches. Morton neuroma is more common in women than in men.

Symptoms

Morton's neuroma may cause Burning, pain, tingling, and numbness often shooting into the toes. Discomfort that is worse while walking. Feeling of a lump between the toes. Symptoms are usually temporarily relieved when taking off shoes, flexing toes or rubbing feet.

Diagnosis

The physician will make the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma based upon the patient's symptoms as described above in an interview, or history, and a physical examination. The physical examination will reveal exceptional tenderness in the involved interspace when the nerve area is pressed on the bottom of the foot. As the interspace is palpated, and pressure is applied from the top to the bottom of the foot, a click can sometimes be felt which reproduces the patient's pain. This is known as a Mulder's sign. Because of inconsistent results, imaging studies such as MRI or ultrasound scanning are not useful diagnostic tools for Morton's neuroma. Thus the physician must rely exclusively on the patient's history and physical examination in order to make a diagnosis.

Non Surgical Treatment

In developing a treatment plan, your foot and ankle surgeon will first determine how long you?ve had the neuroma and evaluate its stage of development. Treatment approaches vary according to the severity of the problem. For mild to moderate neuromas, treatment options may include Padding techniques provide support for the metatarsal arch, thereby lessening the pressure on the nerve and decreasing the compression when walking. Placing an icepack on the affected area helps reduce swelling. Custom orthotic devices provided by your foot and ankle surgeon provide the support needed to reduce pressure and compression on the nerve. Activities that put repetitive pressure on the neuroma should be avoided until the condition improves. Wear shoes with a wide toe box and avoid narrow-toed shoes or shoes with high heels. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation. Treatment may include injections of cortisone, local anesthetics or other agents.Morton neuroma

Surgical Treatment

Surgery is occasionally required when the conservative treatment is not able to relieve your symptoms, particularly if you have had pain for more than 6 months. 80% of patients who require surgery report good results, with 71% of people becoming pain-free.

Prevention

Wearing proper footwear that minimizes compression of the forefoot can help to prevent the development of and aggravation of a Morton's neuroma.
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